Tradition

Acts 26:22, And so, having obtained help from God, I stand to this day testifying both to small and great, stating nothing but what the Prophets and Moses said was going to take place.

When I was young, my family had several traditions. On thanksgiving, we would have a big turkey dinner with extended family. On Christmas Eve we would always get to open one gift, and it usually ended up being pajamas. On Easter we dressed up to go to church, and when we could afford it we would go out to eat. I loved these kinds of traditions.

In Christianity there are also traditions. Different churches have different traditions. Here at FBC, we have a rich tradition of celebrating Easter and Christmas with special songs and decorations. The order of our service and the celebration of the Lord’s Table carries on a tradition in this church. In more practical areas, the saints of this church have a legacy of generosity and service. Traditions like these are often beautiful ways to convey the Gospel and a special reminder of God’s goodness in our life.

But something else to think about is that the Faith itself is traditional- not because of church activity (I.e. what kind of music is sung on Sunday morning or how people dress) but because of beliefs. True faith is rooted in tradition. When Paul argued his defense before his accusers, he argued that what he proclaimed was nothing more than tradition of the faith. The testimony of Jesus Christ was rooted in the Prophets and Moses.

It is not a new rabbit that Paul pulled out of a hat. It was historical tradition. Today, if a church does not carry tradition in this way, it is not a church. Core doctrines are fundamental traditions of the church, worth dying for. The Apostle’s Creed is a sum of historical traditional truth that should be present in every church:
 

I believe in God, the Father almighty,

creator of heaven and earth.

I believe in Jesus Christ, his only Son, our Lord,

who was conceived by the Holy Spirit,

born of the Virgin Mary,

suffered under Pontius Pilate,

was crucified, died, and was buried;

he descended to the dead.

On the third day he rose again;

he ascended into heaven,

he is seated at the right hand of the Father,

and he will come to judge the living and the dead.

I believe in the Holy Spirit,

the holy catholic Church,

the communion of saints,

the forgiveness of sins,

the resurrection of the body,

and the life everlasting.

Amen.

 

Christianity has a rich tradition of being outwardly focused and self sacrificial, pursuing others with the love of Christ and for the sake of the Gospel. May God help us to live for the tradition of the Faith and not the traditions of our preferences.

When we uphold our tradition in order to communicate and celebrate the Gospel, we should consider the outcome. If in the pursuit of our traditions we neglect to show love to others, or if it becomes unhelpful in accomplishing the mission and vision that God has given to our church, then we might pray about changing and starting a new tradition that will help us to accomplish the work that we have been given.

I enjoyed our different traditions growing up. They were fun moments we enjoyed together as a family. In some ways they defined us. In the same way the foundational beliefs of the Church are a tradition that define the Church. Every true Church by definition is traditional. They carry on the beliefs and practices of Christianity in various forms.

Take a moment and reflect on some of your favorite traditions growing up and some of your favorite traditions of this church. Give God thanks for the many good memories and experiences you’ve shared with others through the traditions you have celebrated. Ask God to help you to continue in traditions that are helpful and to show you if there are new traditions that you might start as a celebration of His faithfulness. 

 

Blessings,

Pastor Jeremiah